Do You Want Help in Yukon?

There are many different agencies that can help. Consult the list of resources below or call:

Alcohol and Drug Services

Business hours:
From Whitehorse (8:00 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.) 667-5777
From communities, no charge (8:00 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.) 1-855-667-5777

For after-hours support:
From Whitehorse (4:30 p.m. – 8:00 a.m.) 667-8473
From communites, no charge (4:30 p.m. – 8:00 a.m.) 1-855-667-5777

General Enquiries:
867-667-5777  (Whitehorse)
Toll-free 1-800-661-0408 ext. 5777 (communities)

Yukon Territory

Alcohol and Drug Services

Withdrawal Management (Detox)
Treatment
Yukon-wide Services
Prevention
Parents’ Info
Resource Centre and Services for Professionals
School-based prevention

Other Resources

HealthLine811

Blood Ties

  • Confidential needle exchange and harm reduction services: Monday to Friday 8:30 a.m. to 12 p.m. and 1:00 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.
  • Drug user support group for people anywhere on the drug using continuum: Tuesday from 1:00 p.m. to 2:30 p.m.
  • Counselling and support: wellness@bloodties.ca or 867-332-8268

Many Rivers Counselling and Support Services

Outreach Van – 867-334-1647
Monday to Saturday 4:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.

  • Confidential needle exchange and harm reduction services
  • Outreach nursing services and crisis intervention and supports
Kwanlin Dun First Nation

Counselling Services – 867-668-7289
53 McClimon Crescent, Whitehorse
Monday to Friday (except holidays)
8:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. (closed 12-1 p.m. for lunch)

General counselling services that recognize the interconnection of addictions, trauma, and mental wellness. Services includes play therapy for children, art therapy, individual, couple, and family therapy.  Services are available for all, but priority is given to Kwanlin Dun First Nation citizens.

Jackson Lake Healing Camp – 867-633-7800
21 McCrimmon Crescent
Whitehorse, Yukon
E-Mail: reception@kdfn.net
Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LWRv4V7jwWQ

Jackson Lake is located about a half-hour’s drive from downtown Whitehorse, off of the Fish Lake road. It is in Kwanlin Dün’s traditional territory. For the past five years, we have had one or two intakes per year for on-the-land residential treatment programs at the Centre. Some programs have been for men, others for women. The participants have included people from Yukon First Nations, other First Nations from outside the territory and non-First Nation Yukoners.

The programming at the Centre integrates First Nation cultural ways of healing and clinical approaches.